enquiries@christchurchsandwell.org
0121 552 3625
History

At Christ Church we aim for children to develop a well-rounded knowledge of the past and its events, with intention to improve every pupils' cultural capital and understanding of the world around them, as well as their own identity. We aim for it to inspire pupils’ curiosity about the past and to enable children to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement.



History Overview -  Progression and Breadth of Study



Purpose of Study

History develops a coherent understanding of Britain's past and that of the wider world. History inspires pupils' curiosity and equips them to ask perceptive questions, to think critically, weigh evidence and sift through arguments to develop perceptive judgements. History helps pupils understand the complexity of people's lives, processes of change, the diversity of our societies and relationships with different groups as well as establish their own identity and consider the challenges of their time. 


We aim that through the teaching of History, our children will have mastered - 

• An excellent knowledge and understanding of people, events, and contexts from a range of historical periods and of historical concepts and processes.

• The ability to think critically about history and communicate ideas very confidently in styles appropriate to a range of audiences.

• The ability to consistently support, evaluate and challenge their own and others’ views using detailed, appropriate and accurate historical evidence derived from a range of sources.

• The ability to think, reflect, debate, discuss and evaluate the past, formulating and refining questions and lines of enquiry. 

• A passion for history and an enthusiastic engagement in learning, which develops their sense of curiosity about the past and their understanding of how and why people interpret the past in different ways. 

• A respect for historical evidence and the ability to make robust and critical use of it to support their explanations and judgments.

• A desire to embrace challenging activities, including opportunities to undertake high-quality research across a range of history topics.


We develop children’s cultural capital through the use of resources such as ‘Museum in a box’, historical visitors such as the Oldbury Local History society, and a focus on tier two vocabulary There are also whole school events such as the Pop-Up Museum and Black Country day.

Concepts

 

Progression

 

 

Years 1 and 2

Years 3 and 4

Years 5 and 6


To investigate and interpret the past 

(use a range of sources, select historical information, devise questions)



Historical Enquiry and Historical Interpretation

• Observe or handle evidence to ask questions and find answers to questions about the past.

• Ask questions such as: What was it like for people? What happened? How long ago?

• Use artefacts, pictures, stories, online sources and databases to find out about the past.

• Identify some of the different ways the past has been represented.

• Use evidence to ask questions and find answers to questions about the past.

• Suggest suitable sources of evidence for historical enquiries.

• Use more than one source of evidence for historical enquiry in order to gain a more accurate understanding of history.

• Describe different accounts of a historical event, explaining some of the reasons why the accounts may differ.

• Suggest causes and consequences of some of the main events and changes in history.

• Use sources of evidence to deduce information about the past.

• Select suitable sources of evidence, giving reasons for choices.

• Use sources of information to form testable hypotheses about the past.

• Seek out and analyse a wide range of evidence in order to justify claims about the past.

• Show an awareness of the concept of propaganda and how historians must understand the social context of evidence studied.

• Understand that no single source of evidence gives the full answer to questions about the past.

• Refine lines of enquiry as appropriate.

To build an overview of world history  (make connections, contrast, look at trends over time)

Knowledge and Understanding of Events, People and Changes in the Past

• Describe historical events.

• Describe significant people from the past.

• Recognise that there are reasons why people in the past acted as they did.

• Describe changes that have happened in the locality of the school throughout history.

• Give a broad overview of life in Britain from ancient until medieval times.

• Compare some of the times studied with those of other areas of interest around the world.

• Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.

• Describe the characteristic features of the past, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children.

• Identify continuity and change in the history of the locality of the school.

• Give a broad overview of life in Britain from medieval until the Tudor and Stuarts times.

• Compare some of the times studied with those of the other areas of interest around the world. 

• Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.

• Describe the characteristic features of the past, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children.

To develop a chronologically secure knowledge



Chronological Understanding

• Place events and artefacts in order on a time line.

• Label time lines with words or phrases such as: past, present, older and newer.

• Recount changes that have occurred in their own lives.

• Use dates where appropriate.

• Place events, artefacts and historical figures on a time line using dates.

• Understand the concept of change over time, representing this, along with evidence, on a time line.

• Use dates and terms to describe events.

• Describe the main changes in a period of history (using terms such as: social, religious, political, technological and cultural).

• Identify periods of rapid change in history and contrast them with times of relatively little change.

• Understand the concepts of continuity and change over time, representing them, along with evidence, on a time line.

To communicate using historical terms



Organisation and Communication

• Use words and phrases such as: a long time ago, recently, when my parents/carers were children, years, decades and centuries to describe the passing of time.

• Show an understanding of the concept of nation and a nation’s history.

• Show an understanding of concepts such as civilisation, monarchy, parliament, democracy, and war and peace.

• Use appropriate historical vocabulary to communicate, including: 

• dates 

• time period 

• era 

• change 

• chronology.

• Use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to a good standard in order to communicate information about the past.

• Use dates and terms accurately in describing events including: 

• dates 

• time period 

• era 

• chronology 

• continuity 

• change 

• century 

• decade 

• legacy.

• Use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to an exceptional standard in order to communicate information about the past.

• Use original ways to present information and ideas.



Breadth of Study (subject topics)

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Key Stage 1 Key Areas of Study

  • Changes within living Memory. Where appropriate these should be used to reveal an aspect of change in national life.

  • Events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally

  • The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare an aspect of life in different periods.

  • Significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

Year 1

Significant People

Ourselves

Our family

Florence Nightingale 

Mary Seacole

Edith Cavell


Events In History

Our lives and our parents lives when they were 5 years old

Crimean War

Armistice Day (through assembly)



Significant People

George Stevenson

Wright Brothers


Events In History

1st Locomotive (Stevenson - Birmingham - local link)

The First Aeroplane Flight

Significant People

Ibn Battuta

Christopher Columbus

Neil Armstong

Robert Falcon Scott


Events In History

The ‘discovery’ of the New World

1st Man on the Moon

The Race to the South Pole

Windrush

Year 2

Significant People

Samuel Pepys

Charles II

Guy Fawkes



Events In History

Great Fire Of London

Gunpowder Plot

Significant People

Shang Dynasty

Mayan Civilisation

High Priestess Fu Hao


Events In History

Discovery of Fu Hao’s tomb

1st Writing

Significant People

Alexander Fleming

Marie Curie

Clement Atlee



Events In History

The First Modern Olympic Games (Much Wenlock - local link)

Establishment of the NHS (70+ years of the NHS)

Ks2 Key Areas of Study

  • Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age  

  • The achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following: Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China

  • The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain.  

  • Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world 

  • Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots  

  • The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

  • A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – one study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.

  • A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.  

Year 3

Events/Periods in history


Ancient Greece 


Significant people

Aristotle, Socrates, Plato, Diogenes, Plutarch, Alexander the Great

Events/Periods in history

The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain, Pompeii/Vesuvius

Significant people

Romulus and Remus, Julius Caesar, Pliny the Younger

Events/Periods in history


Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age   - including a local study


Significant people

Mary Anning



Year 4

Events/Periods in history


Early Civilizations achievements and an in-depth study of one: Ancient Egypt  


Significant people

Tutankhamun, Champollion, Carter and Carnarvon.

Events/Periods in history


Roman withdrawal from Britain in AD 410 and the fall of the Western Roman Empire


Significant people

Boudicca, King Prasutagus. Suetonius

Events/Periods in history


The Theme of Industrialisation (introduction) - The growth of railways and the British Seaside


Significant people

Thomas Savery and James Watt

Year 5

Events/Periods in history


The Viking and Anglo Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor


Significant people

Bede and Alfred the Great

Events/Periods in history


A Non European Society that provides contrast - Mayan Civilization  


Significant people

Hernán Cortés 

Events/Periods in history


Local Study - ‘Industrialisation’ (continue from y4 Summer)  locally 


Significant people

Queen Victoria

Year 6

Events/Periods in history

Theme - The Cost of War

 Local Study - Coventry


Significant people

Neville Chamberlain, Adolf Hitler

Events/Periods in history

Theme - The Development of Civil Rights - comparing key historical figures throughout history   (Aspirations)


Significant people

Nelson Mandela, Malala Yousif, Henry VIII, William Shakespear, JK Rowling , Donald Trump

Events/Periods in history


Continued Theme - The Development of Civil Rights - comparing key historical figures throughout history and periods of time (Aspirations)


Significant people - child led choice.

Christ Church C of E Primary School,
Albert Street, Oldbury, B69 4DE
Email: enquiries@christchurchsandwell.org
Tel: 0121 552 3625
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