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R.E.

Religious education in a Church school should enable every child to flourish and to live life in all its fullness. (John 10:10). The principal aim of religious education is to explore what people believe and what difference this makes to how they live, so that pupils can gain the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to handle questions raised by religion and belief, reflecting on their own ideas and ways of living. (Sandwell Syllabus). 



RE - Progression and Breadth of Study


Following RE: Learning and Living - The Sandwell Agreed Syllabus for RE 2018-2023



Purpose Of Study

RE’s place in the curriculum is underpinned by values and purposes. Along with the other subjects of the curriculum, RE aims:

• To provide opportunities for all pupils to learn and to achieve.

• To promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and to prepare all pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of the present and the future.

The following purpose statements underpin the Sandwell syllabus, which is constructed to support pupils and teachers in fulfilling them:

• Religious Education contributes dynamically to children and young people’s education in schools by provoking challenging questions about meaning and purpose in life, beliefs about God, ultimate

reality, issues of right and wrong and what it means to be human.

• In RE pupils learn about religions and beliefs in local, national and global contexts, to discover, explore and consider different answers to these questions.

• They learn to weigh up the value of wisdom from different sources, to develop and express their insights in response, and to agree or disagree respectfully.

• RE teaching therefore should equip pupils with systematic knowledge and understanding of a range of religions and beliefs, enabling them to develop their ideas, values and identities.

• It should develop in pupils an aptitude for dialogue so that they can develop religious literacy and participate positively in our society, with its diverse religions and beliefs.

• Pupils should gain and deploy the skills needed to understand, interpret and evaluate texts, sources of wisdom and authority and other evidence. They should learn to articulate clearly and coherently their personal beliefs, ideas, values and experiences while respecting the right of others to differ.


We aim that through the teaching of RE, our children will have mastered -

• An outstanding level of religious understanding and knowledge.

• A thorough engagement with a range of ultimate questions about the meaning and significance of existence.

• The ability to ask significant and highly reflective questions about religion and demonstrate an excellent understanding of issues related to the nature, truth and value of religion.

• A strong understanding of how the beliefs, values, practices and ways of life within any religion cohere together.

• Exceptional independence; the ability to think for themselves and take the initiative in, for example, asking questions, carrying out investigations, evaluating ideas 

and working constructively with others.

• Significant levels of originality, imagination or creativity, which are shown in their responses to their learning in RE.

• The ability to link the study of religion and belief to personal reflections on meaning and purpose.

• A wide knowledge and deep understanding across a wide range of religions and beliefs. 

Concepts

Progression

 

Years 1 and 2

Years 3 and 4

Years 5 and 6

To make sense of beliefs

(Identifying and making sense of religious and non-religious beliefs and concepts; understanding what
these beliefs mean within their traditions; recognising how and why sources of authority (such as texts) are used, expressed and interpreted in different ways, and
developing skills of interpretation.)

•Identify some core beliefs and concepts studied and give a

simple description of what they mean

• Give examples of how stories show what people believe (e.g. the meaning behind a festival)

• Give clear, simple accounts of what stories and other texts mean to believers.

•Identify and describe the core beliefs and concepts studied

• Make clear links between texts / sources of authority and the core concepts studied

• Offer informed suggestions about what

texts/sources of authority can mean and give examples of what these sources mean to believers.

•Identify and explain the core beliefs and concepts studied, using examples from texts /sources of authority in religions

• Describe examples of ways in which people use texts/sources of authority to make sense of core beliefs and concepts

• Give meanings for texts / sources of authority studied, comparing these ideas with some ways in which believers interpret texts /sources of authority.

To understand the impact of beliefs

(Examining how and why people put their beliefs into practice in diverse ways, within their  everyday lives, within their
communities and in the wider world)

• Give examples of how people use
stories, texts and teachings to guide their beliefs and
actions
• Give examples of ways in which
believers put their beliefs into practice

• Make simple links between stories, teachings and concepts studied and how
people live, individually and in communities
• Describe how people show their beliefs in how they worship and in the way they live
• Identify some difference
in how people put their beliefs into practice.

• Make clear connections between what people believe and how they live, individually and in communities
• Using evidence and examples,show how and why people put their beliefs into practice in different ways, e.g. in different communities, denominations or cultures

To make connections and reflect on the beliefs and practices studied

(Evaluating, reflecting on and connecting the beliefs and practices studied; allowing pupils to challenge ideas studied, and the ideas studied to challenge pupils’ thinking; discerning possible connections between these and pupils’ own lives and ways of understanding the world.)

• Think, talk and ask questions about whether the ideas  they have been studying, have something to say to them.


• Give a good reason for the views they have and the connections they make.

• Raise important questions and suggest answers about how far the beliefs and practices studied might make a difference to how pupils think and live.


• Make links between some of the beliefs and practices studied and life in the world today, expressing some ideas of their own clearly
• Give good reasons for the views they have and the connections they make

• Make connections between the beliefs and practices studied, evaluating and explaining their importance to different people (e.g. believers and atheists)


• Reflect on and articulate lessons people might gain from the beliefs/practices studied, including their own responses,
recognising that others may think differently.

• Consider and weigh up how ideas studied in this unit relate to their own experiences and experiences of the world today, developing insights of their own and giving good reasons for the views they have and the connections they make.


The teaching and learning approach has three core elements, which are woven together to provide breadth and balance within teaching and learning about religions and beliefs, underpinning the aims of RE. Teaching and learning in the classroom will encompass all three elements, allowing for overlap between elements as suits the religion, concept and question being explored. (Sandwell Syllabus page 18)

  1. MAKING SENSE OF BELIEFS

Identifying and making sense of core religious and non-religious beliefs and concepts; understanding what these beliefs mean within their traditions; recognising how and why sources of authority (such as texts) are used, expressed and interpreted in different ways, and developing skills of interpretation.

  1. UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACT

Examining how and why people put their beliefs into action in diverse ways, within their everyday lives, within their communities and in the wider world.

  1. MAKING CONNECTIONS

Evaluating, reflecting on and connecting the beliefs and practices studied; allowing pupils to challenge ideas studied, and the ideas studied to challenge pupils’ own thinking; discerning possible connections between these and pupils’ own lives and ways of understanding the world.

These elements set the context for open exploration of religion and belief. They offer a structure through which pupils can encounter some of the diverse religious traditions, alongside non-religious worldviews, which reflect the backgrounds of many of the pupils in our schools. The three elements present a broad and flexible strategy that allows for different traditions to be treated with integrity. These elements offer a route through each unit while also allowing for a range of questions reflecting approaches from religious studies, philosophy, sociology, ethics and theology.

Breadth of Study (subject topics) for Key Stage 1

Breadth of Study  (subject topics) for Key Stage 2


Christians, Sikhs and Muslims (an additional study of Hinduism where there are many Hindu pupils in a class

Consideration of other religions and non-religious worldviews can occur at any key stage, as appropriate to the school context.


Christians, Muslims, Hindus, Sikhs, Jewish people

Consideration of other religions and non-religious worldviews can occur at any key stage, as appropriate to the school context.







  Term

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

    FS

F1 Being Special: Where do we belong?


Exemplified unit

F2 Why do Christians perform nativity plays at Christmas?


Understanding Christianity?

F3 Why is the word ‘God’ special to Christians? 

Understanding Christianity?

F4 Why do Christians put a cross in an Easter Garden?

Understanding Christianity


Christ Church Visit 

F5 Which Places are special and why?

Exemplified unit


Parent visit from another religion

F6 Which stories are special and why?

Exemplified unit

    Y1

KS1.1- What do Christians believe God is like? Core learning (S)

Church Visit - The Lost Son and praise through song 

KS1.2 Why does Christmas matter to Christians and why do we celebrate special times? Core learning UC Unit - Incarnation 

KS1.7 Beginning to learn Islam: What can we learn from stories of the Prophet?

Mosque Visit 

Exemplified unit

UC Salvation unit 1.6 Why does God matter to Christians? Core learning



KS1.4 Beginning to Learn Sikhi: Part A. Stories of the Sikh Gurus.

Exemplified unit

KS1.11 Questions that puzzle us


Exemplified unit

    Y2

KS1.12 What is the good news Christians believe Jesus brings?

UC Unit

 

KS1.3 Who celebrates what? How and where?

Exemplified unit

UC Incarnation unit 1.3 Why does Christmas matter to Christians? Digging deeper (EXTRA UNIT –FOCUS WEEK PLANNED)

Church Visit Arranged - Nativity

KS1.5 Beginning to Learn Sikhi: Part B. The Gurdwara, a place to belong.

Exemplified unit


Gurdwara Visit – Why is there a kitchen?

KS1.8 Beginning to learn Islam: What can we learn from Muslims in Sandwell? Muslim speaker – prayer

Exemplified unit

UC Salvation unit 1.5 Why does God matter to Christians? Digging deeper (EXTRA UNIT –FOCUS DAY)


 

KS1.9 Holy Places: where and how do Christians, Sikhs and Muslims worship?

Exemplified unit

KS1.10 How and why are some books holy? Sacred words for Sikhs, Muslims and Christians.

Exemplified unit

 

  Term

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

    Y3 

L2.3 What do Christians learn from the creation story? Core learning

UC Creation/Fall unit

L2.1 What are the deeper meanings of festivals?

L2.2 What is it like to be a Hindu? Community , Worship, Celebration (Hindus)


Hindu speaker – parent in – to be arranged



L2.8 What do Christians call the day Jesus died ‘Good Friday?’ 

UC Salvation Unit core learning

Christ Church Visit   

L2.5 What is the ‘Trinity’ and why is it important to Christians? Core learning linked to baptism




L2.4 What is it like to be Sikh in Sandwell? Sikh beliefs and ways of living.

Gurdwara visit

    Y4

L2.6 Values: What matters most? Christians and Humanists




L2.11 Keeping the Five pillars: What difference does it make?  

Mosque Visit 

UC Incarnation/God unit 2a.3 – What is in the trinity? Digging Deeper (EXTRA UNIT – FOCUS WEEK PLANNED)

L2.9 What is it like to be Jewish? Family, Synagogue and Torah

L2.7 What kind of world did Jesus want? 

(UC Gospel unit 2a4) 


UC Salvation unit 2a.5 Digging deeper  (EXTRA UNIT –FOCUS DAY)

L2.10 When Jesus left, what was the impact of Pentecost?


UC 2a.6 Kingdom of God unit


Christ Church Visit – The story of Pentecost 

L2.12 Why does the Prophet matter to Muslims?


Muslim speaker – parent in -  to be arranged     

    Y5

U2.1 What does it mean if God is holy and loving?

(UC2b1 God unit) 


Christ Church Visit  – Biblical ideas about God – Psalm 103, Isiah 6:1-5 

U2.11 Why do Hindus want to be good? Hinduism 

UC Incarnation unit 2b.4 Core learning (EXTRA UNIT – FOCUS WEEK PLANNED)

U2.5 Hindu, Jewish and Islamic Prayer: What? Where? How? When? Why?

UC U2.4 Salvation Unit:  What do Christians believe Jesus did to save human beings?



U2.8 Christians and how to live. What would Jesus do? (U2b.5.UC Gospel unit)


 

U2.9 What will make Sandwell a more respectful community?


2020/21 - Mandir visit

    Y6

U2.7 For Christians, what kind of King was Jesus?  (UC Kingdom of God Unit) x4 weeks


U2.3 Can religions help people when times get hard? (Christian, Hindu, non-religious) x4weeks

U2.6 What can we learn from religion about temptation? (Christians, Muslims)


Incarnation unit 2b.4 Digging deeper (EXTRA UNIT – FOCUS WEEK PLANNED)

U2.2 An Enquiry into visiting places of Worship?

Mosque Visit

Salvation unit -What difference does the resurrection make for Christians? (UC 2b.7)



U2.10 Christian Aid and Islamic Relief: can they change the world? (Christians, Muslims)


 

U2.12 What impact do people’s beliefs have on their lives? (Transition unit)


Christ Church Visit 

Christ Church C of E Primary School,
Albert Street, Oldbury, B69 4DE
Email: enquiries@christchurchsandwell.org
Tel: 0121 552 3625
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